NATO CAN NOT STOP Russian military Iskander missile

 

 

Published on Apr 5, 2014

The 9K720 Iskander (Russian: «Искандер»; NATO reporting name SS-26 Stone) is a mobile theater ballistic missile system produced and deployed by the Russian Federation.
The Iskander-M system is equipped with two solid-propellant single-stage guided missiles, model 9M723K1. Each one is controlled throughout the entire flight path and fitted with an inseparable warhead. Each missile in the launch carrier vehicle can be independently targeted in a matter of seconds. The mobility of the Iskander launch platform makes a launch difficult to prevent.
Targets can be located not only by satellite and aircraft but also by a conventional intelligence center, by a soldier who directs artillery fire or from aerial photos scanned into a computer. The missiles can be re-targeted during flight in the case of engaging mobile targets.[5] Another unique feature of Iskander-M (and Iskander-E)[7] is the optically guided warhead, which can also be controlled by encrypted radio transmission, including such as those from AWACS or UAV. The electro-optical guidance system provides a self-homing capability. The missile’s on-board computer receives images of the target, then locks onto the target with its sight and descends towards it at supersonic speed.
Boost phase thrust vector control (TVC) is accomplished by graphite vanes similar in layout to the V-2 and Scud series tactical ballistic missiles. In flight, the missile follows a quasi-ballistic path, performing evasive maneuvers in the terminal phase of flight and releasing decoys in order to penetrate missile defense systems. The missile never leaves the atmosphere as it follows a relatively flat trajectory. The missile is controlled during the whole flight with gas-dynamic and aerodynamic control surfaces. It uses a small scattering surface, special coatings and small size projections to reduce its radar signature.[8]
The Russian Iskander-M cruises at hypersonic speed of 2100–2600 m/s (Mach 6–7) at a height of 50 km. The Iskander-M weighs 4615 kg, carries a warhead of 710–800 kg, has a range of 400–480 km, and achieves a CEP (Circular error probable) of 5–7 meters. During flight it can maneuver at different altitudes and trajectories and can turn at up to 20 to 30 G to evade anti-ballistic missiles. For example, in one of the trajectory modes it can dive at the target at 90 degrees at the rate of 700–800 m/s performing anti-ABM maneuvers.[4][9]
Iskander has achieved sufficient accuracy, range and reliability (ability to penetrate defenses) to function as an alternative to precision bombing for air forces that cannot expect to launch bombing or cruise missile fire missions reliably in the face of superior enemy fighters and air defenses. Training and competence requirements are much lower than for normal air force assets such as a fighter bomber squadron utilizing guided bombs.[citation needed]
Iskander is a tactical missile system designed to be used in theater level conflicts.[10] It is intended to use conventional warheads for the engagement of small and area targets (both moving and stationary), such as hostile fire weapons, air and antimissile defense weapons, command posts and communications nodes and troops in concentration areas, among others. The system can therefore destroy both active military units and targets to degrade the enemy’s capability to wage war.
In 2007, a new missile for the system (and launcher), the R-500 Iskander-K (K stands for krylataya or winged) cruise missile, was test fired.[11] Now complex Iskander-M is transmitted to the troops complete with cruise and ballistic missiles. In 2013, army missile brigades were first received missiles equipped with a new control system.[12]

One Response to NATO CAN NOT STOP Russian military Iskander missile

  1. Adm 06/04/2014 at 07:36 #

    HELSINKI — The likelihood of Finland acquiring a new surface-to-surface missile system from Russia has increased following a preliminary decision by the Finance Ministry here to opt for a more up-to-date and cost-efficient launcher-fired tactical missile.

    The ministry’s decision happens against a backdrop where the government has announced more than $3 billion in public spending cuts across various departments as the government struggles to tame rising national debt.

    The search for a “more cost-efficient” tactical missile means that Finland has effectively dropped its interest in Lockheed Martin’s surface-to-surface MGM-140 Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) for the Finnish Army.

    Finland’s Ministry of Defense had signaled interest in acquiring the ATACMS as recently as January, setting aside a budget of about $140 million for the purpose. The ATACMS has a range of up to 188 miles (300 kilometers).

    “The missile project has been put on hold due to budgetary reasons, and due to the high unit price,” said Arto Koski, a commercial adviser attached to the MoD’s Material and Projects Unit. “The ATACMS is a very expensive and relatively old system. We must now evaluate our entire material development.”

    The focus has shifted, Koski said, to acquiring a surface-to-surface missile solution that is “more modern and affordable. We know of alternatives that would fulfill the same technological need.”

    Finland’s interest in ATACMS peaked in mid-2012, when negotiations with the US culminated in a congressional permit to purchase up to 70 tactical missiles. Finland had earlier agreed to acquire US joint air-to-surface stand-off missiles for the Finnish Air Force’s upgraded F-18 Hornet fighter jets.

    The prospect of an ATACMS deal heightened in 2006, when the Finnish Army acquired a second-hand M270 multiple launch rocket system (MLRS) from the Netherlands for $62 million. A further $50 million was spent to render the MLRS launchers compatible with ATACMS missiles. Because the M270 launchers contain US technology, Finland sought and received US congressional approval for the acquisition.

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